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Jan24

MHCLG Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings 20 January 2020

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This Advice Note dated 20 January 2020 consolidates and supersedes the existing Advice Notes 1 to 22.  The advice on the assessment of non-ACM external wall systems (previously Advice Note 14) has been updated and incorporated, and some of the advice within the previous published notes has been condensed to make it clearer. The Advice Note also clarifies how the 18m height of a building is measured as it was silent in various other Advice Notes issued.

 

Item 1.6 refer to the proposed new Fire Safety Bill and states:

‘The government has announced its intention to introduce a Fire Safety Bill which will clarify that building owners and managers of multi-occupied residential premises of any height must fully consider and mitigate the risks of any external wall systems and fire doors in discharging their duties under the Fire Safety Order.  We strongly advise building owners to consider the risks of any external wall system and fire doors in their fire risk assessments, irrespective of the height of the building, ahead of the planned clarification.’

 

The Advice note states under 1.10 that external walls of residential buildings should not assist the spread of fire, irrespective of height.

‘Existing residential buildings which have external wall systems that contain combustible materials may not meet an appropriate standard of safety and could pose a significant risk to the health and safety of residents, other building users, people in the proximity of the building or firefighters. External walls of residential buildings should not assist the spread of fire, irrespective of height. It is important therefore to understand both the materials used in the external wall construction and whether the entire system has been designed, installed, and, maintained appropriately. 

 

The Advice note states under 1.11 that 11 while the use of combustible within or attached to external walls of residential buildings below 18m is not currently expressly prohibited, it has been a legal requirement since the 1980s to consider the risk from fire spread. This is in accordance with the functional requirements of the Building Regulations.

 

‘1.11. While the use of combustible materials within or attached to external walls of residential buildings below 18m is not currently expressly prohibited, it has been a legal requirement since the 1980s to consider the risk from fire spread. This is in accordance with the functional requirements of the Building Regulations.  It is also a requirement of the Fire Safety Order that any purpose-built block of flats – regardless of height – should have an up to date fire risk assessment and appropriate fire precautions in place’

MHCLG Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings 20 January 2020

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  • MHCLG Advice for Building Owners of Multi-storey, Multi-occupied Residential Buildings 20 January 2020

    AdobeStock 233161102

     

    This Advice Note dated 20 January 2020 consolidates and supersedes the existing Advice Notes 1 to 22. The advice on the assessment of non-ACM external wall systems (previously Advice Note 14) has been updated and incorporated, and some of the advice within the previous published notes has been condensed to make it clearer.


    The Advice Note also clarifies how the 18m height of a building is measured as it was silent in various other Advice Notes issued.

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    Approved Document B was revised in 2019  and supports requirements B1 to B5 of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2010 as well as regulations 6(3), 7(2) and 38 and it took effect on 30 August 2019 for use in England. 

    One of the changes were that safety information (under regulation 38) has been moved from an appendix into a new section.

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    In late December 2019 the EWS1 form was published.

    The RICS, the BSA and UK Finance have agreed an industry-wide process, to be used by valuers, lenders, building owners and fire safety experts, in the valuation of high-rise properties to help unblock the deadlock present in the housing market. It has been developed in conjunction with MHCLG (the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government.